Posts filed under Ontario

Albert Edgar Miller

Miller Lake, Revelstoke National Park, c.1915

Miller Lake, Revelstoke National Park, c.1915

Dates: b. Ontario, 1872 d. Victoria, 24 April 1950

Cemetery Location: Block G, Row 10, Plot 43

Profile:

Albert Miller grew up on a farm near Port Perry, Ontario, before moving to Vancouver in 1899 to obtain his British Columbia teaching certification. He taught in Vancouver for 2½ years, before moving to Revelstoke to become the first principal of the new, red brick building in 1903.

In 1908, Albert was appointed inspector of schools for the Revelstoke district, and he continued in that capacity until 31 August 1939. Albert had a reputation as a strict disciplinarian, but maintained a keen interest in the progress of each of his students, even long after they had left school.

Albert was a keen hiker and climber, and at least once a year took his teachers up Mount Revelstoke for a tour of the meadows and lakes. Miller Lake on top of Mt Revelstoke bears his name.

Following retirement, Albert became active in local organizations and even operated the Revelstoke Tourist Bureau for one year. The Knights of Pythias selected him for the Good Citizen Award in 1946, for the ‘fundamental tenants of good citizenship’.

After several years of ill health, Albert’s wife Eva Bartley died on 19 January, 1946, and in the summer of that year, Albert moved to Victoria, B.C., after residing in Revelstoke for 43 years.

Prior to his death in 1950, Albert bequeathed two parcels of land to the City of Revelstoke for park and recreational purposes: Birchcliffe, close to Begbie Falls, and Kiwana Park, now part of Centennial Park.

Central School, date unknown.

Central School, date unknown.

Grade 1 class, Central School, date unknown.

Grade 1 class, Central School, date unknown.

Samuel & Martha Pletsch

Dates:

Samuel Pletsch: b. 1885 d. 27th April 1959

Martha Pletsch: b. 1889 d. 27th April 1959

Cemetery Location:

Samuel Pletsch: Block E, Row 2, Plot 26

Martha Pletsch: Block E, Row 2, Plot 26

Profiles:

A mudslide claimed the lives of long-term Revelstoke residents, Samuel and Martha Pletsch, on CPR Hill on Good Friday, 1959. 32-year old nurse, Vera Schuetze, and her 10-month old son, Eric, were also killed in the slide.

Samuel Pletch was a native of Walkerton, Ontario. He worked as Canadian Pacific Railway yard foreman in Revelstoke for many years, and his love of gardening was evident in their large garden on CPR Hill.

Martha Pletsch came to Revelstoke in 1900 from the Maritimes when her father, the late Reverend W.C. Calder, became minister of the local Presbyterian Church. At the time of the tragedy, Martha had a daughter from her first marriage, Mrs. Fred Westlake, a brother Merle Calder and a sister Mrs. Dan McIntosh.

Samuel Pletsch had two sons, Earl and Norman, and two daughters, Nellie and Florence. (Earl Pletsch became one of Revelstoke’s most prominent ski jumpers.)

Samuel & Martha Pletsch's son, ski jumper Earle Pletsch, 1947.

Samuel & Martha Pletsch's son, ski jumper Earle Pletsch, 1947.

Fred Robinson

Fred Robinson, date unknown.

Fred Robinson, date unknown.

Dates: b. Yorkshire, England, October 1852 d. Revelstoke, 27 November 1917

Cemetery Location: Block C, Row 8, Plot 33

Profile:

Revelstoke lumber industry pioneer Fred Robinson was originally from Ontario’s Lake Simcoe County, his family immigrating to Canada from England in 1859. In 1871 Fred married Eliza C. Sheppard of Toronto, and they had three children (one child dying in infancy) before she died in 1876. In 1885, Fred married his second wife, Julia O. Moore, who gave birth to another three children.

After establishing a successful sawmill operation at Beavermouth, British Columbia in the 1880s, Fred sold his interest in the company and returned to Toronto in 1891. In December 1896, Fred moved to Revelstoke to take over the sawmill company owned by his brother, Dan, renaming the business “Fred Robinson Lumber Co.”

Fred expanded the operation with the purchase of Kootenay Lumber Company’s mill at Comaplix on the northeast arm of the upper Arrow Lakes. He obtained the timber rights between Comaplix and Camborne, and the company also owned two small steamers, the ‘Archer’ and the ‘Lardeau’. In November 1901, Fred Robinson Lumber Co. received an order for 2.5 million feet of logs for the Canadian Pacific Railway and the company could barely keep up with demand.  In July 1903, Fred sold the business to the Bowman Lumber Co. of Minneapolis.

When the mill in town burned down in 1910, it was probably one of the most spectacular fires in Revelstoke history, and threw a large number of men out of employment.  People as far away as Mackenzie Avenue spent the night soaking their roofs with water from garden hoses to extinguish the flying sparks.

Having contributed greatly to the development of Revelstoke, Fred died on 27 November 1917, at the age of 65. His obituary states:

"He was a man of wide friendship and genial mind, clever and progressive, ever ready to seize new opportunities offered in a new land”.
Robinson lumber mill, Revelstoke.

Robinson lumber mill, Revelstoke.

Reginald Upper

The Upper family

The Upper family

Dates: b. 1875 d. 1919

Cemetery Location: Block C, Row 12, Plot 34

Profile:

Born in Ontario, Reginald Upper came to Revelstoke in 1894 prospecting and working as a hotelier. In August 1900, he was appointed as Provincial Police and Chief Licence Inspector for the Revelstoke area. He also worked for the Revelstoke City Police, and the CPR Police. His family had a farm and dairy business where Upper Place townhouses (next to the golf course) are now located.

In September of 1919, Reginald had gone hunting with friends K.G. McRae, D.R. MacDougall and Guy Barber to Greely Creek. They returned to Revelstoke and stopped in front of Guy Barber’s Jewellery Store on Mackenzie Avenue. When Mr. Barber got out of the vehicle, two of Mr. Upper’s dogs, which were in the rear seat, became active and somehow caused one of the guns to discharge, the bullet entering Mr. Upper’s body just under the right arm, penetrating the right lung. He was rushed to the hospital, but died three hours later, leaving behind his wife, Selma Turnross Upper, and seven children between the ages of two and sixteen.

Reginald Upper fishing, date unknown

Reginald Upper fishing, date unknown