Posts tagged #Illecillewaet River

Samuel Crowle

One of Revelstoke's earliest farmers, Sam Crowle, date unknown.

One of Revelstoke's earliest farmers, Sam Crowle, date unknown.

Dates: b. Cornwall, England, 16 December 1861 d. 1943

Cemetery Location: Block B, Row 2, Plot 10

Profile:

Samuel David Crowle was the first settler south of Revelstoke in the Mount Begbie area. He came to Canada in 1883 to work on the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway before settling in Revelstoke in 1885. 

Acquiring farming land three miles south of Revelstoke (today the site of Revelstoke airport), Samuel supplied many of Revelstoke’s hotels with produce. Prior to the construction of the Revelstoke Arrowhead branch line in 1894, there was no bridge across the Illecillewaet River and Samuel had to ferry his produce and supplies by boat.

Sam was also involved in the early mining days in the Big Bend area, operating a pack train from Revelstoke north for three years, before selling the operation to George Laforme.

After his death in 1943 at the age of 82, the ownership of his property was passed on to his nephew, David Crowle.

Fred Forrest

Group standing in front of Waverley Mines shed, Albert Canyon, 1897.

Group standing in front of Waverley Mines shed, Albert Canyon, 1897.

Dates: b. Scotland, 1872 d. 17 March 1947

Cemetery Location: Block G, Row 10, Plot 15

Profile:

Frederick Elliott Forrest was born in Leith, Scotland, in 1872. His father, Charles Forrest, was a partner in Forrest & Turnbull, a sugar importing company. After some time in Belgian Congo (Zaire), Fred moved to British Columbia in 1897 to work for The Gold Fields of British Columbia, a British company that operated the Tangier and Waverley Mines at Albert Canyon.

By 1899, the mines had closed down, but Fred remained in Albert Canyon for 50 years, working as the local fire warden for much of this time. He also published the quirky Albert Canyon newspaper. 

According to his obituary, Fred spent almost every Saturday in Revelstoke, bringing with him beautiful bouquets from his garden to give away to the locals.

Fred was active in political circles in the early days as a Liberal and in 1907, largely financed the campaign of the late A.B. Cayley, unsuccessful Liberal candidate in the local riding.  Records also show Fred once petitioned the Minister of Public Works to install a fish ladder at the dam on the Illecillewaet River, which he regarded as an ‘insurmountable obstacle’ to fish.

At the time of his death on 17 March 1947, aged 75, Fred was survived by a brother L.S. Forrest, Oxford, England; a sister, Mrs. C.L. Gilby, Exeter, England; a sister-in-law, Mrs. J.M. Forrest; a nephew and three nieces in Courtenay.

Frank Julian (Juliano)

Dates: b. Italy, 1952 d. Revelstoke, 21 September 1910

Cemetery location: Block H, Row 31, Plot 29

 Profile:

Frank Julian was born Francesco Juliano in Italy. The family came to Revelstoke in 1894, settling on a farm on the lower loop road just south of town. In 1904, they built and moved into a home at 411 Second Street East. Before coming to Revelstoke, Julian had lived in Chicago and San Francisco. It was believed that he had crossed the “Black Hand” at some point.

In July 1909, Julian’s son-in-law, Frank Orsetti, was the victim of a stabbing outside the Julian home. The assailants were caught and sent to prison.

The following year in September 1910, Frank was clearing his farmland near the Illecillewaet River when he met up with three Italian transients who agreed to help him for board and pay. He left the house on Second Street on 21 September 1910, telling his family he would be back that evening. The next day he had not returned, and his family contacted the police, who sent out a search party. Louis Cashato discovered Frank’s body, covered with brush near his clearing.

Julian had been attacked from behind with one of his own axes, receiving a deep gash in the head and another across the throat. His forehead had been marked with a black cross, which could not be removed. This was believed to be the mark of the Black Hand. A piece of his skin was sent to Ottawa for identification, and it was determined only that it was a corrosive substance.

The murder was never solved. The three men who planned to work for him were found and cleared.