Posts filed under catholic

Berarducci Family

 Christie & Caterina Berarducci's wedding, 19 April 1925.

Christie & Caterina Berarducci's wedding, 19 April 1925.

Dates:

Anthony (Antonio) Berarducci: b. 1865 d. 16 Dec 1945

Filomena Berarducci: b. 16 March 1880 d. 18 September 1859

Christie Berarducci: b. 2 October 1899 d. 6 June 1989

Caterina Berarducci: b. 20 April 1906 d. 19 January 1992

Cemetery Location:

Anthony Berarducci: Block J, Row 18, Plot 28

Filomena Berarducci: Block J, Row 18, Plot 29

Christie Berarducci: Block H, Row 10, Plot 13

Caterina Berarducci: Block H, Row 10, Plot 14

Profile:

The first of the Berarducci family to come to Revelstoke were Mr. and Mrs. Antonio Berarducci, who arrived from Italy in 1898. Antonio worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway and they had seven boys and three girls; all born in Revelstoke.

Their eldest son, Christie, joined the CPR in 1918 and married Caterina Bafaro on 19 April 1925. They made their home on Downie Street and raised a family of six children.

Caterina Berarducci and her daughter, Filomena Devlin, recalled the wonderful, annual picnics hosted by the Italian Lodge on the J. Ferro property, with free ice-cream and pop for the kids, and free wine and beer for the adults. Filomena also remembered horse-drawn sleigh rides in the winter and Easter Sunday walks down the south track to welcome spring.

For a time, Caterina helped many new immigrants settle into Revelstoke. She would accompany them to the hospital or doctors to help with translation.

Christy retired from the CPR in 1964 after 46 years of service.

Julius Cashato

Dates: b. Italy, 1873, d. Vancouver, 1949

Cemetery Location: Block J, Row 18, Plot 14

Profile:

One of Revelstoke’s earliest Italian residents, Julius Cashato arrived in the city in 1893, via the United States. When he first arrived he worked in the Julian Shingle Mill, just south of Revelstoke. Five years later, he married Sophie Julian, daughter of the mill owner.

Mr. and Mrs. Cashato farmed at Mount Begbie for many years. They had three daughters: Jean, Anne and Oliffe.

In the days when travel was more difficult than today, visits to the Cashato farm were an event. The pioneer couple kept ‘open house’ and entertained generously.

Local citizens recalled the famous barbecue the family hosted to honor the late W. H. Sutherland, former Minister of Public Works. Several hundred people attended the banquet, typical of the Cashato’s hospitality.

According to his obituary, Julius was well known for his “cheerful personality–even in the face of insurmountable difficulties, he was serene, happy and good natured.”

He died at the age of 76 at Vancouver Hospital, after suffering from ill health for several months.

Neil (Emile) & Aida Colacurcio (Colarch)

Dates:

Neil (Emile) Colarch: b. Italy, 18 September 1887 d. 4 December 1977

Aida Colarch: b. Italy, 26 July 1896 d. 15 March 1989

Cemetery Location:

Aida Colarch: Block J, Row 27, Plot 11

Neil (Emile) Colarch: Block J, Row 27, Plot 11

Profiles:

 (from left) Neil Colarch, Ruby Rutherford, Estelle and Earle Dickey, and Sandy and Annie Fleming, c.1939.

(from left) Neil Colarch, Ruby Rutherford, Estelle and Earle Dickey, and Sandy and Annie Fleming, c.1939.

Neil and Aida Colarch and their son Emile moved from Italy to British Columbia in the 1890s, settling in Revelstoke in 1899.

Neil’s first job in town was with Robinson’s sawmill, before moving on to work for the Canadian Pacific Railway.

Aida lived to the age of 92.

The family’s angel headstone is one of only two of its type in Mountain View Cemetery.

Posted on September 19, 2016 and filed under Italian, catholic.

William & Bertha Cowan

 William Cowan, Revelstoke, c.1914.

William Cowan, Revelstoke, c.1914.

Dates:

William Cowan: b. Ontario, 1855 d. 13 April 1926

Bertha Cowan: b. 1855 d. 7 September 1906

Cemetery Location:

William Cowan: Block F, Row 10, Plot 37

Bertha Cowan: Block H, Row 18, Plot 33

Profiles:

William Cowan was born in Ontario in 1855. He came to Revelstoke in June 1885 and built the Victoria Hotel on the riverside of Front Street, on the north corner of Wright Street. He was one of the original partners in the Columbia Kootenay Navigation Company that built the steamers ‘Despatch’ and ‘Lytton’. 

In 1890 he established telephone service between his hotel and the CPR Station, and in 1896, formed the Big Bend, Trout Lake and Revelstoke Telephone company. In 1897 William built the Cowan Block at Third and Charles for the telephone office. He also founded the Revelstoke Water, Light and Power Company in the 1890s, which provided the first water system to the city in 1896, and the Illecillewaet Dam in 1898. The Power Company was bought by the city in 1902. 

In 1903 Cowan married Bertha Beatrice King, who was 20 years his junior and they had a son, William Patrick, born in 1904. Bertha died during childbirth on 7 September 1906. The child did not survive. Bertha was Roman Catholic, and was one of the first burials in the Catholic section of the cemetery, which opened in 1906.

William Cowan is buried across the road in the Protestant section, directly behind the maintenance shed.  At that time, the Catholic Church did not allow non-Catholics to be buried in consecrated ground, and William did not convert to Catholicism. 

 Cowan Block, Third and Charles Street,  Revelstoke, c.1900. The property was built in 1897 to house the Revelstoke Telephone Company.

Cowan Block, Third and Charles Street,  Revelstoke, c.1900. The property was built in 1897 to house the Revelstoke Telephone Company.

Christopher & Joseph Daem

 Christopher Daem c.1930.

Christopher Daem c.1930.

 Joseph Daem. c.1930.

Joseph Daem. c.1930.

Dates:

Christopher Daem: b. Revelstoke, 1908 d. February 1933

Joseph Daem: b. Revelstoke, 1909 d. February 1933

Cemetery Location:

Christopher Daem: Block J, Row 27, Plot 19

Joseph Daem: Block J, Row 27, Plot 21

Profiles:

Brothers Christopher and Joseph Daem set out on a ski trip through Duchesay Pass, between Banff and Field, on 24 February 1933, but failed to return.

According to the local newspaper, a number of search parties were mobilized but they were unable to find any sign of the men.

“As a result of their recklessness a number of men are risking their lives and the Canadian Rockies are liable to receive a bad name. Expert skiers claim, however, that skiing is perfectly safe in the Rockies, providing normal precautions are taken. There is no such evidence that the lost men took such precautions.”

After several months, the bodies of Christopher and Joe were discovered by Swiss guides in June, 1933. They had been buried under avalanche debris.

Christopher was 25 and embarking on a writing career and Joe, 24, was a graduate in engineering from Queen’s University.  Joe had undertaken survey work in Rogers Pass for several years, was an experienced climber and like his brother, familiar with the terrain through which their last journey was made.

The Daems were a well-known Revelstoke family and the incident deeply affected the town’s residents. The brothers left behind their parents, Joseph and Rose Daem, two brothers, Joris and Frank, and two sisters, Joan and Alberta.

Christianziano Fossacceca (Matz)

Dates: b. 1859 d. 12 March 1933

Cemetery location: Block H, Row 26, Plot 23

Profile:

Christianziano Fossacceca came to Canada in the 1880s, working west with the railway construction. He worked at the roundhouse in Donald, then transferred to Revelstoke in the late 1890s.

Christianziano smoked a pipe and when he was not using matches to relight his pipe, he was chewing on them. The CPR time keeper refused to write out his name, which earned him the nickname “Jack Match.” Fossacceca adopted the name, but spelled it Matz. He married the sister of Louis Catlin, and they had one son and six daughters, some of whom were baptized as Fossacceca, and some as Matz.

Posted on September 19, 2016 and filed under Italian, catholic.

Dominic Gallicano

 Dominic Gallicano (right) outside bakery, date unknown.

Dominic Gallicano (right) outside bakery, date unknown.

Dates: b. Italy, 1863 d. 12 January 1947

Cemetery Location: Block J, Row 26, Plot 35

Profile:

Dominic Gallicano emigrated to Donald, British Columbia, from Italy in 1893 to work for the Canadian Pacific Railway. A year later, Dominic returned to Italy to marry, and brought his wife, Henrietta Defeo, and 6-month old son, Tangres, to Donald in 1895.

Not long after their daughter Eda was born, the family moved to Revelstoke, settling about 100 yards from the railway tracks. The passenger trains in those days did not carry dining cars, so Dominic began baking bread (out of a large brick oven in his yard) to sell to passengers, along with milk and groceries.

By July 1899, Dominic had established a grocery store on Mackenzie Avenue (his two-storey building at 210 Mackenzie Avenue was the first on that block) and in December 1899, his bakery opened on the corner of Second Street and Victoria Road. 

Dominic continued to work for the railway for almost 20 years while running the two stores. In 1915, the bakery was moved into the newly-built concrete building next to the grocery store – the Sally Ann Bakery – and the family operated the business until 1988.

The Gallicanos had seven children: two boys and five girls. Dominic died on 12 January 1947, at the age of 84.

 Gallicano bakery, 1915.

Gallicano bakery, 1915.

 Dominic Gallicano (seated) with daughters Eda and Sylvia and son Tangree, c.1918.

Dominic Gallicano (seated) with daughters Eda and Sylvia and son Tangree, c.1918.

Daniel Edward Jackson

Dates: b. 1870 d. 14 January 1912

Cemetery Location: Block H, Row 19, Plot 16

Profile:

Daniel Edward Jackson was born in Montreal in 1869, moving to Revelstoke to work as a machinist for the Canadian Pacific Railway around 1900. He was killed in an avalanche at Rogers Pass on 14 January 1912, at the age of 42.

According to the Mail Herald newspaper, Daniel was hurrying to help a derailed eastbound train when the avalanche struck the train he and the other rescuers were travelling on, two miles east of Rogers Pass.

Daniel had worked for the CPR in Revelstoke for 13 years. He was also a prominent member of the Machinists Union and served for one year on the Executive of the Conservative Association of Revelstoke.

He and his wife Rose had seven children: Frank, Alexander, Grace, Tannis, Arthur, Florence and Vivian. After the accident, the family moved east around 1916.

Frank Julian (Juliano)

Dates: b. Italy, 1952 d. Revelstoke, 21 September 1910

Cemetery location: Block H, Row 31, Plot 29

 Profile:

Frank Julian was born Francesco Juliano in Italy. The family came to Revelstoke in 1894, settling on a farm on the lower loop road just south of town. In 1904, they built and moved into a home at 411 Second Street East. Before coming to Revelstoke, Julian had lived in Chicago and San Francisco. It was believed that he had crossed the “Black Hand” at some point.

In July 1909, Julian’s son-in-law, Frank Orsetti, was the victim of a stabbing outside the Julian home. The assailants were caught and sent to prison.

The following year in September 1910, Frank was clearing his farmland near the Illecillewaet River when he met up with three Italian transients who agreed to help him for board and pay. He left the house on Second Street on 21 September 1910, telling his family he would be back that evening. The next day he had not returned, and his family contacted the police, who sent out a search party. Louis Cashato discovered Frank’s body, covered with brush near his clearing.

Julian had been attacked from behind with one of his own axes, receiving a deep gash in the head and another across the throat. His forehead had been marked with a black cross, which could not be removed. This was believed to be the mark of the Black Hand. A piece of his skin was sent to Ottawa for identification, and it was determined only that it was a corrosive substance.

The murder was never solved. The three men who planned to work for him were found and cleared.

Marino Family

Dates:

Frank Marino: b. Italy, 7 June 1860 d. 5 March 1937

Anna (Annie) Marino: b. 23 April 1878 d. 28 October 1927

Joseph Marino: b. 1893 d. 1 Jan 1944

Cemetery Location:

Frank Marino: Block J, Row 28, Plot 17

Anna (Annie) Marino: Block J, Row 28, Plot 16

Joseph Marino: Block B, Row 14, Plot 19

Profiles:

Frank Marino and his brother, Piedro, were among the first Italians to settle in Revelstoke, immigrating to the west coast of British Columbia in the early 1880s to work for the Canadian Pacific Railway. After the death of his first wife, Frank brought his young son, Joseph, to Revelstoke, where they lived with Piedro and his wife, Vischensa.

Frank married his second wife Anna (Annie) Theresa Sanseverino in St. Francis of Assisi Roman Catholic Church on 18 October 1903, and they had ten children: two boys, five girls and three babies who died in infancy.

In 1905, the couple purchased 169 acres of land northeast of the old city hydro dam (on the site of the current K.O.A campground) and built a large family home.

The family was largely self-sufficient, with cows, goats and chickens. However, during the winter months when they were snowed in, the children were unable to attend school. When Vischensa died in 1924, and Piedro in 1925, leaving their home to Frank, the family could move closer to town in the winter. After the death of Frank in 1937 (at the age of 76) the farm was left vacant.

Joseph Marino was a veteran of two world wars, serving with the Royal Canadian Artillery in World War II. He was discharged from the service on account of his age in 1939. On 1 January 1944, at the age of 53, he and three others drowned in a tragic accident – their car plunging over the end of a ferry in Victoria, B.C.

Florence (Frank) McCarty

 Revelstoke's first mayor, Frank McCarty.

Revelstoke's first mayor, Frank McCarty.

Dates: b. 1854 d. 1920

Cemetery location: Block H, Row 32, Plot 33

Profile:

McCarty and his wife Mary were born in Wisconsin, USA. They came to Canada in 1883, following the railway construction across the country. They lived at Laggan (Lake Louise) for a while, cutting fuel for the old wood burner locomotives.

By 1889, the McCartys were operating a boarding house on the hill above the CPR station. It was advertised as a temperance house with board and lodging at $5 per week. Individual meals were 25 cents and beds were 25 cents a night.

Frank McCarty ran a butcher shop, was involved in the mining business, and also a part owner of the SS Revelstoke.

Frank became Revelstoke’s first mayor after the city was incorporated in March 1899. They built their family home that year at the corner of Mackenzie Avenue and Third Street. He later ran a livery business and steam laundry and owned a 60 acre ranch across the Illecillewaet River. He died in June of 1920.

 McCarty home on Third & Mackenzie Streets.

McCarty home on Third & Mackenzie Streets.

Anselmo (John) Pradolini

 Pradolini family, c.1935

Pradolini family, c.1935

Dates: b. Orsaria, Udine, Italy, 18 March 1875 d. 1948

Cemetery Location: Block J, Row 17, Plot 25

Profile:

Anselmo Pradolini arrived in Canada in 1903 with his brother Gaudenzio and five friends from the Italian Alps. They came directly to Revelstoke to work for the Canadian Pacific Railway as masons, and within a few months, Alsemo began the construction of his home at 613 Fourth Street East (affectionately known as the ‘Pink Castle’). His wife, Rosa, and brother, Achille, arrived from Italy in 1904.

Anselmo left CPR to set up his own contracting business, with Achille in charge of cement work. The first house they built was 220 Fifth Street East for A.E. Miller, principal of the new Central School. In 1906, they built Revelstoke’s first concrete block home at 601 Fourth Street East, for the Porta family.

Some of the buildings constructed during his partnership with Mr. Foote included: the Revelstoke Court House; Selkirk School; Guy Barber’s Jewellery store; C.R. Macdonald’s Drug Store; the Howson Block; and the stone facing on the King Edward Hotel – all completed before World War I.

Anselmo served as alderman for several years and as the first Italian mayor of Revelstoke from 1934 to 1936. He was a charter member of Rotary, president of the Board of Trade in 1931, and active in the Italian lodge. He also helped fellow Italians bring out their family members to Canada, filling out government forms and guaranteeing employment on their arrival, even helping some to establish their own businesses.

Alsemo had a love for music and built a bandstand at Queen Elizabeth Park, where on fine Sunday afternoons, local residents would dress up and to listen to the Italian Band.

When a gang of criminals started an extortion racket targeting Italian families in Revelstoke, Anselmo helped track down the local offenders.

Anselmo and Rosa had four children: Linda, Mario, Elio and Alfredo, who died at the age of one.  Anselmo and Rosa both died in 1948.

 Rosa & Anselmo Pradolini with children

Rosa & Anselmo Pradolini with children

 Man on horse-drawn sled with view of Pradolini house in background (far right)

Man on horse-drawn sled with view of Pradolini house in background (far right)

George Williamson

 George Williamson's last CPR run, 1940.

George Williamson's last CPR run, 1940.

Dates: b. 26 March 1875 d. 15 June 1971

Cemetery Location: Block H, Row 11, Plot 15

Profile:

George left his hometown Toronto to follow his father, mother and sister west in 1892, finding a job as a wiper for the Canadian Pacific Railway at Donald, British Columbia. At the time, Donald was the thriving mountain divisional headquarters for CPR. (The headquarters were transferred to Revelstoke in 1899.)

In 1897, George was promoted to fireman and in 1900 to engineer, ending his long career as a railroader on 30 March 1940, when he brought engine 2716 and the Toronto Express into Revelstoke.

The highlight of 38 years of service with CPR came in the summer of 1939, when he was selected to pilot the engine of the Royal Train of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth, from Revelstoke to Kamloops.

During his career, George was lucky to escape several close calls through Rogers Pass. In the summer of 1898, the engine he was piloting struck an uprooted tree near no. 35 snowshed, tearing the side of the engine’s cab completely away. In another incident, he and other crewmembers narrowly escaped an avalanche while cleaning up the remains of the winter’s snowslides. And in the summer of 1924 or 1925, when George missed a shift due to illness in the family, the train he was meant to be on derailed near Golden, B.C., killing two of his colleagues.

George’s first wife Mamie died in 1936, and his second wife, Violet, in 1966. His only son, William George, died in April 1968.

George died in 1971, aged 96 years. He left behind two daughters, Marie and Margaret, eight grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.