Abrahamson Family

John Abrahamson, Kootenay Mail, December 1904.

John Abrahamson, Kootenay Mail, December 1904.

Dates:

Charles A. Abrahamson: b. Dorsland, Sweden, 1856 d. 21 December 1911

Andrew Abrahamson: b. Dorsland, Sweden, 1850 d. 5 February 1931

Otto William Abrahamson: b. Dorsland, Sweden, 1865 d. 17 March 1955

Noah Abrahamson: b. Dorsland, Sweden, 1861 d. 23 April 1942

John Abrahamson: b. Dorsland, Sweden, 1854 d. 27 September 1933

Cemetery Location:

Charles A. Abrahamson: Block C, Row 12, Plot 30

Andrew Abrahamson: Block C, Row 12, Plot 29

Otto William Abrahamson: Block F, Row 9, Plot 19

John Albert Abrahamson: Block B, Row 14, Plot 32/33

Profile:

The Abrahamson brothers were born in Dorsland, Sweden, immigrating to the United States in 1880.  Two years later, the older brothers Andrew, John and Charles –stonecutters and bridge builders by trade – followed the Canadian Pacific Railway construction westward.

In Donald, British Columbia, the brothers established a hotel business, eventually moving to Revelstoke in 1885. Unable to pack their pool table (a big money earner in the hotel business) over Rogers Pass, it was shipped by boat down the Columbia River, to what began as a 40-foot tent hotel on Front Street.  By 1908, the Central Hotel had grown into a three-storey building with accommodation for over 100 guests, and was popular with commercial travellers.

In 1888, Otto, William and Noah Abrahamson arrived in Revelstoke via the United States to join their brothers, and together they laid out the town site of Trout Lake in 1891. Andrew and Noah remained in Trout Lake to run the Queens Hotel, while John and Charles managed the Central Hotel in Revelstoke. In 1918, the Central Hotel was purchased by Molson’s Bank, and in 1919 it was bought and demolished by A. Pradolini.

Otto Abrahamson was a contractor who built many well-known buildings in Revelstoke, including: the Queen Victoria Hospital on First Street in 1912; the Howson Block on Mackenzie Avenue in 1911; the brick high school on Third Street in 1914; the Selkirk Hotel on First and Orton Street (now part of the Regent Hotel); and the Agricultural Hall (now the Golf Club).

 J.R. Hull & Co. Meat Market and Abrahamson home, c.1900

 J.R. Hull & Co. Meat Market and Abrahamson home, c.1900

Agricultural Hall (now the Revelstoke Golf Club), 1914, built by O.W. Abrahamson.

Agricultural Hall (now the Revelstoke Golf Club), 1914, built by O.W. Abrahamson.

Central Hotel, Front Street, c.1910.

Central Hotel, Front Street, c.1910.

Charles Abrahamson headstone

Oliver Hector Allen

Dates: b. 10 August 1858 d. Revelstoke, 19 July 1928

Cemetery Location: Block A, Row 2, Plot 6

Profile:

Oliver Henry Allen was born in Ontario in 1858, the son of a well-known Toronto brewer. While serving as lieutenant in the Riel Rebellion in Saskatchewan, Oliver met Mary Mclean, an editorial writer for the Regina Star, and they married on 30 August 1884.

In 1888, the Allens moved to Calgary and opened the Bow Valley Brewery. In 1889, they closed the brewery and moved to Revelstoke, where he partnered with Thomas Righton to open A & R Brewery in August 1890. The business was dissolved by October the same year, but Oliver immediately began working on a new brewery, which he built on the north bank of the Columbia River. The Revelstoke Brewery opened May 1891, specializing in fine class ales and porter.

An article from the Kootenay Mail, 1 December 1894, described the Revelstoke Brewery as the largest of its kind in the Kootenays. “The buildings now present an appearance of a small village, there having been recently added to the lager beer brewery a new ice house with a capacity of 150 tons.”

Oliver closed the brewery in 1900, but worked for the Enterprise Brewery in 1901 and 1902. In 1903, Allen started another brewing operation behind the Revelstoke Wine & Spirit Company’s building (RCMP detachment location), in partnership with William Johnson. Under the resurrected name, Revelstoke Brewery, the business operated until 1906.

Oliver died in Revelstoke in 1928, at the age of 69. The newspaper obituary claims he died in Queen Victoria Hospital, but according to his family, while in hospital he overheard a nurse say he would not make it past the night.  So Oliver left the hospital and walked home, wrote a note to his wife, then harnessed up the horse and buggy to drive to Three Valley; he wanted to see one more sunrise before he died. The engineer on an eastbound train saw Mr. Allen slumped over in the buggy, 20 feet from the railway, and phoned to notify the family.

The Allens had six children: Emma, Thomas, Marie, Dalton, Marjory and Jack. Their son, Thomas Allen, shot and killed his sister Marie’s husband, David Calder, during an argument at the Allen’s Eagle Pass ranch in 1924.

Benjamin Richard Atkins

Mr. & Mrs. B. R. Atkins skiing, c.1920s.

Mr. & Mrs. B. R. Atkins skiing, c.1920s.

Dates: b. Ireland, 1866 d. Kamloops 1941

Cemetery Location: Block A, Row 13, Plot 17

Irish born Benjamin Atkins came to Revelstoke in 1896 as owner and editor of the Kootenay Mail newspaper. He served as private secretary to Premier Semlin in 1899 and later returned to Revelstoke as collector of customs, a position he held until 1921. At that time, he became a feature newspaper writer and completed a manuscript entitled Columbia River Chronicles. He died in Kamloops, B.C., in 1941.

Thomas W. Bain

Dates:  b.1855 d. 2 April 1921

Cemetery Location: Block F, Row 15, Plot 19

Profile:

Originally from Lanark County, Ontario, Thomas Wilbert Bain moved to Illecillewaet, British Columbia, in April 1885. After founding Thomas Bain Mining Co., he established the Laurie Mines at Illecillewaet and the Dunvegan Mines south of Flat Creek.

On 9 Jan 1889, Thomas married Mary McRae in Ottawa and they lived together at the mining camp at Illecillewaet until 1890, when they acquired farming land along the Fraser River, near Dewney, B.C.  The couple had three daughters: Mrs. Nellie MacDonald, Mrs. Tessie Barton and Mrs. Alice “Allie” Paterson.

The Bains farmed at Dewney until they lost everything in the flood of 1894; moving back to Revelstoke where Tom would prospect for the next five years. When Revelstoke was incorporated in 1899, Tom became the city’s first chief of police.  He retired from the force in 1910 and became jail warden until his death in 1921, aged 66.

Thomas was prominent in Masonic circles. He was a past master of Kootenay Lodge, past principal of the Revelstoke Chapter, Revelstoke Arch Masons and Knights Templar. He was also a past grand master of Selkirk Lodge IOOF and a member of Gold Range Lodge, Knights of Pythias.

On the day of his funeral, the city hall flag flew at half-mast, the fire hall bell tolled for 20 minutes and businesses closed for an hour – a fitting tribute to one of Revelstoke’s earliest pioneers.

Louise Beavo

Dates: b. 1859 d. 13 November 1891

Cemetery Location: Block C, Row 10, Plot 49

Profile:

Louise Beavo’s burial marker is the oldest remaining marker in the cemetery, although there were earlier burials. The marker has the date of death as 1892, but the marker was not made until 1893, and the date is incorrect.

Louise Beavo was 32 years old when she died of rheumatic fever. She had two young boys, Willie and George, aged eight and six. At the time of her death, she was working as manager of the Columbia House Hotel on Front Street on behalf of her mother, Barbara Clark of Clinton, who was the business partner of William M. Brown (who built the hotel in 1885). The hotel was the first on Front Street. 

After her daughter’s death, Barbara Clark moved to Revelstoke to raise her grandsons. She died in 1915 and is buried next to her daughter. 

Albert & Alice Bennison

Albert & Alice Bennison, Bennison Bakery (next to City Hall), 1909.

Albert & Alice Bennison, Bennison Bakery (next to City Hall), 1909.

Dates:

Albert E. Bennison: b. 2 June 1867 d. 1 April 1913

Alice M. Bennison: b. 29 December 1859 d. 25 January 1937

Cemetery Location:

Albert Bennison: Block C, Row 13, Plot 21

Alice M. Bennison: Block C, Row 13, Plot 20

Profiles:

Albert E. Bennison immigrated to Canada in 1888, purchasing the Lawson building on MacKenzie Avenue in 1903 to open the City Bakery (today the home of the Modern Bakeshop). Albert ran the City Bakery for several years, but in January 1907, he retired from the business.

In February 1907, Albert married Alice Melinda Williamson, registered as a midwife in Revelstoke. Alice was previously married to Arthur M. Williamson and had settled in Revelstoke with her husband in 1893.

According to her family, Alice and Arthur had two children who died from diphtheria at a young age and a son, John Lloyd. Williamson’s Lake Park, five kilometers south of Revelstoke, is the site of the former Williamson farm.

Not long after Albert and Alice were married, Albert worked as a jail guard, but was suspended for giving alcohol to a group of prisoners in his charge. Apparently he had been running a chain gang on a hot day, and had given the inmates beer to quench their thirst.

After Albert left the jail, he worked as a rancher and on a bridge gang, where he was in a bad accident. While being treated for his injuries, a tumour was discovered at the base of his brain and he died in April 1913, at the age of 45.

Alice Bennison died 24 years later in 1937, at the age of 78.

Berarducci Family

Christie & Caterina Berarducci's wedding, 19 April 1925.

Christie & Caterina Berarducci's wedding, 19 April 1925.

Dates:

Anthony (Antonio) Berarducci: b. 1865 d. 16 Dec 1945

Filomena Berarducci: b. 16 March 1880 d. 18 September 1859

Christie Berarducci: b. 2 October 1899 d. 6 June 1989

Caterina Berarducci: b. 20 April 1906 d. 19 January 1992

Cemetery Location:

Anthony Berarducci: Block J, Row 18, Plot 28

Filomena Berarducci: Block J, Row 18, Plot 29

Christie Berarducci: Block H, Row 10, Plot 13

Caterina Berarducci: Block H, Row 10, Plot 14

Profile:

The first of the Berarducci family to come to Revelstoke were Mr. and Mrs. Antonio Berarducci, who arrived from Italy in 1898. Antonio worked for the Canadian Pacific Railway and they had seven boys and three girls; all born in Revelstoke.

Their eldest son, Christie, joined the CPR in 1918 and married Caterina Bafaro on 19 April 1925. They made their home on Downie Street and raised a family of six children.

Caterina Berarducci and her daughter, Filomena Devlin, recalled the wonderful, annual picnics hosted by the Italian Lodge on the J. Ferro property, with free ice-cream and pop for the kids, and free wine and beer for the adults. Filomena also remembered horse-drawn sleigh rides in the winter and Easter Sunday walks down the south track to welcome spring.

For a time, Caterina helped many new immigrants settle into Revelstoke. She would accompany them to the hospital or doctors to help with translation.

Christy retired from the CPR in 1964 after 46 years of service.

Robert Ayre Blackmore

Riverboat captain, Robert Blackmore, date unknown.

Riverboat captain, Robert Blackmore, date unknown.

Dates: b. England 1867 d. 17 September 1944

Cemetery Location: Block A, Row 14, Plot 14

Profile:

English-born Robert H. Blackmore spent most of his life in the Big Bend country. He was a river guide on the Columbia River for 50 years.

In the early years, the Columbia was an important transport route for fur traders, but with the arrival of the railways, the use of the river for this purpose declined. Bob Blackmore, however, kept the route alive for timber cruisers, hunters and prospectors, guiding them through the treacherous waters of the Big Bend.

Tragically, in September 1944, the veteran voyager went missing, presumed drowned, on the Columbia River; his boat was recovered 16 kilometers south of Revelstoke. His friends believe he stumbled when making a landing somewhere along the river and lost his balance, falling into the water.

Robert Blackmore, Walter Nelson and unknown woman booming logs, Big Eddy, 1920. 

Robert Blackmore, Walter Nelson and unknown woman booming logs, Big Eddy, 1920. 

Bourne Family

Bourne family home, Sixth Street East.

Bourne family home, Sixth Street East.

Dates:

Henry Josiah Bourne: b. Rainham, UK, 1861 d. March 1905

Frank Herbert Bourne: b London, 1862 d. Vancouver, 1958

Edwards James Bourne: b. London, 1865 d. 23 September 1938

Cemetery Location:

Henry Josiah Bourne: Block C, Row 3, Plot 33

Frank Herbert Bourne: Block C, Row 3, Plot 32

Edward James Bourne: Block C, Row 3, Plot 31

Family memorial at Cemetery:  Red polished granite

Profiles:

Originating from England, the Bourne brothers were a pioneering merchant family who established their retail business in Revelstoke in the late 1900s.

The eldest Bourne brother, Henry Josiah Bourne, became postmaster for Upper Town in 1891 and Justice of the Peace in 1892.  He married Ella Miller in September 1895 and died in March 1905, after a long battle with lung disease.

Edward James Bourne moved to Revelstoke in 1890, where he was accountant for Bourne Bros. and managed the men’s furnishings department. He retired in 1938 and died 23 September 1938. 

The fourth brother, John Dupre Bourne, was storekeeper with CPR when he settled in Revelstoke around 1904, but moved to Vancouver around 1907. He died in August 1927, leaving behind a wife and six children.

The first Bourne Bros. store was in the 100 Block east on Victoria Road, followed by a large frame building constructed on the north side of the railway. In addition to groceries, general provisions, gents’ furnishings and hardware, the building also housed the Upper Town post office, which was opened in 1891.

In January 1901, Bourne Bros. sold their dry goods and clothing business to Reid and Young to concentrate on their growing grocery and hardware business, with newly established branches in Nakusp and New Denver. Henry and Frank Bourne’s partnership was dissolved in March 1905 after Henry’s death, but the business continued under the name Bourne Bros., with Frank Bourne as the sole owner. In 1912, the business was moved into the grand, newly built brick building on the corner of First Street and Campbell Avenue. In May 1918, the store was passed to a mortgage corporation in Vancouver.

Bourne Bros. Store, 1890s.

Bourne Bros. Store, 1890s.

Edgar & Catherine Burridge

Edgar & Catherine Burridge, date unknown.

Edgar & Catherine Burridge, date unknown.

Dates:

Edgar Burridge: b. England, 1867, d. 1940

Catherine Burridge: b. Quebec, 1868 d. 1940

Cemetery Location:

Edgar Burridge: Block F, Row 9, Plot 20

Catherine Burridge: b. Block F, Row 9, Plot 21

Profiles:

Edgar George Burridge was born in London, England, and as a young man immigrated to Canada where he met and married Catherine Spearn in Barrie, Ontario, in 1889. The couple lived for a time in Toronto and Winnipeg before Edgar moved to Revelstoke in 1894 and found employment with Lawrence Hardware (now the site of the Roxy Theatre).

Catherine and their son Harold followed Edgar to Revelstoke in 1897. The family grew with the birth of Gertrude in 1898, Adelaide in 1900, Stewart in 1904 and Alfred in 1906. In 1912 Edgar and Harold opened a tin-smithing shop, E.G Burridge and Son, and in 1926, Edgar, Harold and Stewart bought out Humphries’ Plumbing and Electrical business on Second Street and Orton Avenue. Both shops were operated as E.G Burridge and Sons.

Edgar was a long standing member of the Knights of Pythias, Gold Range Lodge No. 26. and his shop was a regular stopping place for many townspeople, where issues of the day and subjects such as science, history and literature were debated and discussed. According to her granddaughter, Catherine was a kind, gentle lady who fed and clothed the needy who came to her door during the depression (once giving away her son’s prized hiking boots!) She was an active member of the Crystal Temple Pythian Sisters, St. Peters Church and Parochial Guild.

Catherine and Edgar celebrated their golden wedding anniversary in 1939 before they both died the following year in 1940.

E. G. Burridge & Son. Plumbing & Tinsmithing, c.1950.

E. G. Burridge & Son. Plumbing & Tinsmithing, c.1950.

Rev. W. C. Calder

Rev. William Calder, date unknown.

Rev. William Calder, date unknown.

Dates: b. Halifax, Nova Scotia, 1852 d. September 1931

Keywords: Presbyterian Church, Tonka Farm, Big Eddy, Alice Calder, David Calder

Cemetery Location: Block C, Row 13, Plot 18

William Caldwell Calder entered the ministry at an early age, moving his wife, Alice Mary Calder (nee Trump), and children west in the mid-1890s. He accepted the ministry position at Revelstoke Presbyterian Church in 1900. When a second Presbyterian church was established, Rev. Calder took over the ministry of St. Andrew’s Church. He retired when the two churches united in 1910.

Upon retirement, Mr. Calder began farming his land ‘Tonka Farm,’ at the Big Eddy amid the mountain scenery they all loved so much.  In 1915, the family purchased a valuable herd of Ayrshire cows to enter the dairy business. When the shortage of feed over winter became evident, the family built a silo the following summer – the first of its kind in the Revelstoke district.

After a brief illness, Mr. Calder died in 1931, at the age of 80. Alice Calder died in 1957 at the age of 94. The Calders had seven sons and three daughters: Bruce, Donald, Merle, Rex, William, James, David, Margaret, Martha, and a daughter who died prior to moving to British Columbia.

David Calder was shot by his brother-in-law, Thomas Allen, at the Allen’s Big Eddy residence on 20 July 1924. He died of his injuries at the Queen Victoria Hospital on 6 August 1924, at the age of 41, leaving behind a wife and four children.

The Calder family, date unknown.

The Calder family, date unknown.

Tonka Farm, Big Eddy, September 1963.

Tonka Farm, Big Eddy, September 1963.

Daniel Robert Campbell

Dates: b. Ontario, 1861, d. 1936

Cemetery Location: Block E, Row 1, Plot 61

Profile:

Daniel and Margaret Campbell (nee McQuat) came to British Columbia in 1889, settling firstly in Beavermouth, where Dan worked for the local sawmill. In 1904, Dan, Maggie and their five children: Arthur, Percy, Leslie, Gladys and Gordon, moved to Revelstoke, settling at first in the Big Eddy.

In 1907, Dan purchased 51 acres east of Revelstoke on a bench overlooking the town. He built a homestead and barns, and established a small mixed farm with dairy cows, pigs, fruits and vegetables. By 1920, Daniel and sons Arthur and Leslie realized the potential for a dairy in Revelstoke. Their business, the Hillcrest Dairy, supplied the city with milk until 1956.

After Dan’s death in 1936, Arthur and Leslie became partners in the business, which they expanded through the purchase of adjoining properties. By 1954, the farm (primarily all dairying at this point) had grown to 1,600 acres.

When the Trans Canada Highway bisected the property west to east, it was no longer profitable to run the producer-vendor dairy business, and it was sold in 1956. (Parts of the property were sold for the Johnson Heights and KOA developments.)

Mrs. Margaret Campbell and family, c. 1898.  

Mrs. Margaret Campbell and family, c. 1898.

 

Julius Cashato

Dates: b. Italy, 1873, d. Vancouver, 1949

Cemetery Location: Block J, Row 18, Plot 14

Profile:

One of Revelstoke’s earliest Italian residents, Julius Cashato arrived in the city in 1893, via the United States. When he first arrived he worked in the Julian Shingle Mill, just south of Revelstoke. Five years later, he married Sophie Julian, daughter of the mill owner.

Mr. and Mrs. Cashato farmed at Mount Begbie for many years. They had three daughters: Jean, Anne and Oliffe.

In the days when travel was more difficult than today, visits to the Cashato farm were an event. The pioneer couple kept ‘open house’ and entertained generously.

Local citizens recalled the famous barbecue the family hosted to honor the late W. H. Sutherland, former Minister of Public Works. Several hundred people attended the banquet, typical of the Cashato’s hospitality.

According to his obituary, Julius was well known for his “cheerful personality–even in the face of insurmountable difficulties, he was serene, happy and good natured.”

He died at the age of 76 at Vancouver Hospital, after suffering from ill health for several months.

Wing Chung

Wing Chung and grandchildren, 1955.

Wing Chung and grandchildren, 1955.

Dates: b. China, 1863 d. Vancouver, 1955

Cemetery Location: Block F, Row 3, Plot 29

Profile:

Wing Chung is widely regarded as the patriarch of Revelstoke’s early Chinese community. He immigrated to Canada at the age of 16 to work on the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway, and according to his obituary, was present at the driving of the last spike.

Settling in Revelstoke in the mid-1880s, Wing operated a general store on Front Street importing goods from China for the local Chinese community, as well as groceries, fruit and candy for the Europeans. Later, the Wing Chung store was relocated to a large building uptown on 200 Block, First Street West, and his family lived in the back of the building.

Wing’s first wife battled with sickness and died on December 18, 1910, at the age of 38. His second wife Jung Ling gave birth to four sons: Hai (Henry) Quan Sam, Hong Sham Ging (Jack Sam), Mee Lai Sham Ging (Sham Lai Mee) and Ark Sham Ging (Kaye Sam). Wing also had a daughter in China. During a trip to their home country, Jung Ling succumbed to asthma and died in December 1920, on board the ship back to Canada. Wing Chung’s third wife had another two sons: Owen Sam and Ming Sam.

Active in Revelstoke business organizations, Mr. Chung was secretary of the Chinese Freemasons. In later life, Wing Chung moved to Vancouver to live with his son Lai Mee, and died in Vancouver in 1955, at the age of 92.

James & Marjory Cleland

Dates:

James Cleland: b. Torfechan, Scotland, 13 July 1880 d. 19 February 1920

Marjory Cleland: b. 1906 d. 27 June 1920

Cemetery Location:

James Cleland: Block F, Row 15, Plot 28

Marjory Cleland: Block F, Row 15, Plot 29

Profiles:

James “Scotty” Cleland was born in Torfechan, Scotland, on 13 July 1880. He joined the Edinburgh police in May 1900, where he served for seven years before immigrating to Canada in 1907. After a short period in Montreal, James moved west to Revelstoke in 1909, where he was employed by the local police force and promoted to Chief of Police in 1916. During his career, James suffered a gunshot wound while arresting a man attempting to rob the Dominion Express Office.

James died at the age of 39 in 1920, following complications from the flu. His funeral was well attended, many citizens lining the sidewalks on Second Street to say goodbye. He left behind a wife and four children: Malcolm, Marjory, Ina and James.

Tragically the same year, James’s 14 year-old daughter, Marjory Cleland, was drowned when her boat capsized on the Columbia River on the 27 June 1920. Three other young people from Revelstoke, aged 18 to 21 years, also lost their lives in the accident. Two months later, on 26 August 1920, the Cleland family home was burnt to the ground, allegedly caused by faulty electrical wiring in the front of the house. Only a few valuable papers and a pet canary were saved from the fire.

Neil (Emile) & Aida Colacurcio (Colarch)

Dates:

Neil (Emile) Colarch: b. Italy, 18 September 1887 d. 4 December 1977

Aida Colarch: b. Italy, 26 July 1896 d. 15 March 1989

Cemetery Location:

Aida Colarch: Block J, Row 27, Plot 11

Neil (Emile) Colarch: Block J, Row 27, Plot 11

Profiles:

(from left) Neil Colarch, Ruby Rutherford, Estelle and Earle Dickey, and Sandy and Annie Fleming, c.1939.

(from left) Neil Colarch, Ruby Rutherford, Estelle and Earle Dickey, and Sandy and Annie Fleming, c.1939.

Neil and Aida Colarch and their son Emile moved from Italy to British Columbia in the 1890s, settling in Revelstoke in 1899.

Neil’s first job in town was with Robinson’s sawmill, before moving on to work for the Canadian Pacific Railway.

Aida lived to the age of 92.

The family’s angel headstone is one of only two of its type in Mountain View Cemetery.

Posted on September 19, 2016 and filed under Italian, catholic.

Henry Colbeck

SS Revelstoke at Downie Creek, 1905.

SS Revelstoke at Downie Creek, 1905.

Dates: b. England, 1869 d. Revelstoke, August 1949

Cemetery Location: Block A, Row 14, Plot 16

Profile:

One of Revelstoke’s earliest pioneers, Henry Colbeck came to the Okanagan from England in 1889, and based himself in Kelowna at a time when it was little more than a steamboat call. He found employment on the first steamboat to ply Okanagan Lake, later joining the crew on steamer ‘Penticton’, and then the ‘Aberdeen’ in 1892.

Henry’s work took him to all the inland lakes and rivers servicing the Canadian Pacific Railway, including Arrow Lakes and the Columbia River.

He worked as chief engineer on the ‘SS Revelstoke’, which operated north and south of Revelstoke from 1902 until 1914.  The Revelstoke Navigation Company built the steamboat in Nakusp to restore navigation to the Big Bend country. The rugged little boat had a freight capacity of 40 tons and was licensed to carry 10 passengers.

When he retired, Henry and his wife acquired farmland on the Big Bend Highway, just north of Revelstoke. He died at the age of 80, in August 1949.

William & Bertha Cowan

William Cowan, Revelstoke, c.1914.

William Cowan, Revelstoke, c.1914.

Dates:

William Cowan: b. Ontario, 1855 d. 13 April 1926

Bertha Cowan: b. 1855 d. 7 September 1906

Cemetery Location:

William Cowan: Block F, Row 10, Plot 37

Bertha Cowan: Block H, Row 18, Plot 33

Profiles:

William Cowan was born in Ontario in 1855. He came to Revelstoke in June 1885 and built the Victoria Hotel on the riverside of Front Street, on the north corner of Wright Street. He was one of the original partners in the Columbia Kootenay Navigation Company that built the steamers ‘Despatch’ and ‘Lytton’. 

In 1890 he established telephone service between his hotel and the CPR Station, and in 1896, formed the Big Bend, Trout Lake and Revelstoke Telephone company. In 1897 William built the Cowan Block at Third and Charles for the telephone office. He also founded the Revelstoke Water, Light and Power Company in the 1890s, which provided the first water system to the city in 1896, and the Illecillewaet Dam in 1898. The Power Company was bought by the city in 1902. 

In 1903 Cowan married Bertha Beatrice King, who was 20 years his junior and they had a son, William Patrick, born in 1904. Bertha died during childbirth on 7 September 1906. The child did not survive. Bertha was Roman Catholic, and was one of the first burials in the Catholic section of the cemetery, which opened in 1906.

William Cowan is buried across the road in the Protestant section, directly behind the maintenance shed.  At that time, the Catholic Church did not allow non-Catholics to be buried in consecrated ground, and William did not convert to Catholicism. 

Cowan Block, Third and Charles Street,  Revelstoke, c.1900. The property was built in 1897 to house the Revelstoke Telephone Company.

Cowan Block, Third and Charles Street,  Revelstoke, c.1900. The property was built in 1897 to house the Revelstoke Telephone Company.

Samuel Crowle

One of Revelstoke's earliest farmers, Sam Crowle, date unknown.

One of Revelstoke's earliest farmers, Sam Crowle, date unknown.

Dates: b. Cornwall, England, 16 December 1861 d. 1943

Cemetery Location: Block B, Row 2, Plot 10

Profile:

Samuel David Crowle was the first settler south of Revelstoke in the Mount Begbie area. He came to Canada in 1883 to work on the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway before settling in Revelstoke in 1885. 

Acquiring farming land three miles south of Revelstoke (today the site of Revelstoke airport), Samuel supplied many of Revelstoke’s hotels with produce. Prior to the construction of the Revelstoke Arrowhead branch line in 1894, there was no bridge across the Illecillewaet River and Samuel had to ferry his produce and supplies by boat.

Sam was also involved in the early mining days in the Big Bend area, operating a pack train from Revelstoke north for three years, before selling the operation to George Laforme.

After his death in 1943 at the age of 82, the ownership of his property was passed on to his nephew, David Crowle.

Christopher & Joseph Daem

Christopher Daem c.1930.

Christopher Daem c.1930.

Joseph Daem. c.1930.

Joseph Daem. c.1930.

Dates:

Christopher Daem: b. Revelstoke, 1908 d. February 1933

Joseph Daem: b. Revelstoke, 1909 d. February 1933

Cemetery Location:

Christopher Daem: Block J, Row 27, Plot 19

Joseph Daem: Block J, Row 27, Plot 21

Profiles:

Brothers Christopher and Joseph Daem set out on a ski trip through Duchesay Pass, between Banff and Field, on 24 February 1933, but failed to return.

According to the local newspaper, a number of search parties were mobilized but they were unable to find any sign of the men.

“As a result of their recklessness a number of men are risking their lives and the Canadian Rockies are liable to receive a bad name. Expert skiers claim, however, that skiing is perfectly safe in the Rockies, providing normal precautions are taken. There is no such evidence that the lost men took such precautions.”

After several months, the bodies of Christopher and Joe were discovered by Swiss guides in June, 1933. They had been buried under avalanche debris.

Christopher was 25 and embarking on a writing career and Joe, 24, was a graduate in engineering from Queen’s University.  Joe had undertaken survey work in Rogers Pass for several years, was an experienced climber and like his brother, familiar with the terrain through which their last journey was made.

The Daems were a well-known Revelstoke family and the incident deeply affected the town’s residents. The brothers left behind their parents, Joseph and Rose Daem, two brothers, Joris and Frank, and two sisters, Joan and Alberta.