Peter Boyd Shaw - Lest We Forget

Peter Boyd Shaw was born June 21, 1888 at Inverness, Scotland.  He was the son of Alexander and Elizabeth Shaw of Urchany Cawdor, Scotland. His occupation was bank clerk. At the time of his enlistment he was living in Vancouver.

 Peter Boyd Shaw signed his enlistment papers on October 4, 1917 at Vancouver.  His medical examination took place in Vernon. His regimental number was 2557322. He was 29 years old, single, 5’ 11” tall with black hair and grey eyes. His religious affiliation was Presbyterian.

 Peter Boyd Shaw died on October 3, 1918 during the One Hundred Day final Canadian offensive of the war. He was 30 years old. At the time of his death he was a Gunner with the 12th Siege Battalion, 3rd Brigade, Canadian Garrison Artillery. He is buried at the Bucquoy Road Cemetery, France. At some point between his enlistment and death he married Catherine Shaw of Inverness, Scotland.

 The only mention of Peter Boyd Shaw we were able to locate in the local newspapers of the war era was an item carried in the May 13, 1916 edition mentioning him among a list of voters objected to by the local Liberal party Association.

 The name of Peter Boyd Shaw is inscribed on the Courthouse and Cenotaph plaques.

 

John James Rushton - Lest We Forget

John James (Jack) Rushton was born on November 25, 1885 at Liverpool, England. He listed no next of kin on his attestation papers. His occupation was dairyman. He may have been working for Mrs. Andrew Carlson of Revelstoke.

John James Rushton signed his enlistment papers on July 9, 1915 at Vernon.  He was 29 years old, single, 5’ 4” tall with black hair and brown eyes. His regimental number was 443312. His religious affiliation was Anglican. He was one of about 100 men from Revelstoke to enlist with the 54th Battalion in the spring and summer of 1915. Rushton sailed out of Halifax on November 22, 1915 on the Saxonia, arriving at Plymouth on December 1. He proceeded for service at the front on June 18, 1916.

John James (Jack) Rushton died October 15, 1916 of wounds suffered in the Somme offensive. He was almost 31 years old. At the time of his death he was a Private with the 2nd Battalion, Canadian Infantry (Eastern Ontario) Regiment. He is buried at the Contay British Cemetery, France.

The November 2, 1916 edition of the Revelstoke Review carried this notice of the death of Jack Rushton:

“Mrs. Andrew Carlson was notified last night of the death of Private Jack Rushton, who died of wounds received in the recent battles on the Somme front in France.”

The name of Jack Rushton is inscribed on the Courthouse and Cenotaph plaques.

 

James Rowbottom - Lest We Forget

James Rowbottom was born on December 5, 1887 in Liverpool, England. His mother was Mrs. Margaret Rowbottom, a widow whose address was listed as 420 St. Paul Street, Kamloops.

James Rowbottom signed his attestation papers on or around October 6, 1915 in Kamloops. His regimental number was 129961. He listed previous military experience with the Canadian Engineers. He was a trainman with the Canadian Pacific Railway. He was 5’9 ½ “ tall, and had grey eyes and brown hair. He sailed from Halifax on the Empress of Britain on April 23, 1916, arriving in England on May 7, 1916. He proceeded for service in France on August 12, 1916.

James Rowbottom died October 30, 1917 at the age of 29. At the time of his death he was a Corporal in the 72nd Battalion, Canadian Infantry (British Columbia) Regiment. His body was never found or identified and his name is memorialized on the Menin Gate (Ypres) Memorial, Belgium.

The following item was reported in the Revelstoke Review on November 29, 1917: “Word has been received that James Rowbottom, formerly a CPR brakeman of this city, was killed while in action in France on October 30th. The sympathy of the people of Kamloops will go out to the mother who is now living in Revelstoke.” The newspaper reported that another son had been killed eight months previously, but the only other member of the Rowbottom family to serve was James’ brother, Thomas Harold Rowbottom, who survived and returned to Canada. He married Annie Blair in Kamloops in 1921.  

The name of James Rowbottom is inscribed on the Courthouse and Cenotaph plaques. His name is also on the YMCA Honor Roll.

 

Posted on August 21, 2018 .

Walter Ernest Robinson - Lest We Forget

Walter Ernest Robinson was born August 19, 1893 at Revelstoke. He was the son of John Robinson, born July 1, 1866 in Ontario, of English descent, and Alice Robinson, born June 30, 1871 in Nova Scotia, of German descent. Alice Robinson died in 1902 and John Robinson remarried Alice (Hendricks) Jackson in 1904. John came to Revelstoke around 1891 to work for his brothers Dan and Fred at Revelstoke’s first sawmill. Walter had two sisters: Ada, born 1892 and Myrtle, born 1896 and two brothers: Victor, born 1895 and Arthur, born 1898. All the Robinson children were born in Revelstoke. Walter also had many cousins in Revelstoke, the children of Dan and Fred.  Walter was in the employ of P. Burns & Co. butcher shop at the outbreak of the war and was living with his sister, Mrs. P. Loesch, whom he listed as next of kin.

Walter Ernest Robinson signed his enlistment papers February 9, 1915 at Victoria. He had volunteered with the Second Canadian Contingent. His regimental number was 51395. He gave his occupation as soldier. He was 21 years old, single, 6’ tall with light brown hair and brown eyes. His religious affiliation was Presbyterian.

Walter Ernest Robinson died April 22, 1915 during the battle of Ypres. He was the first Revelstoke man to die in battle in the Great War. He was 21 years old. At the time of his death he was a Private serving with the 16th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (Manitoba) Regiment.  His body was never found or identified and his name is memorialized on the Menin Gate (Ypres) Memorial, Belgium. 

Walter’s brother Arthur also perished in the war. He perished very near the end while Walter perished at the beginning.  Arthur’s body was also never found or identified and his name is memorialized on the Vimy Memorial. Thus the two memorials to the Canadian overseas dead bear witness to two brothers from Revelstoke. Another brother, Victor, also served but he managed to survive the war. They also had at least two cousins who served overseas, Beverley and Fred, both sons of Dan Robinson.

On May 1, 1915 a letter from Walter Robinson, sent on April 11, 1915 sent to J.E. Dickson, was printed in the Mail-Herald. By the time the letter was printed, Walter was already dead. In it he told of the battle of Neuve Chappelle and said that he had gone through places which the Germans had bombarded and it was an awful sight. Walter said that he came into the trenches on the night of April 9, 1915 about 1 am and bombardment started around 6:30 am along with a lot of enemy rifle fire. Their section managed to make their objective without casualties. They were a nervous bunch but excited and happy. Official word of Walter Robinson’s death was not received until the middle of July of 1915, as there was previously some confusion as to whether he had been taken prisoner.

The name of Walter Robinson is inscribed on the Courthouse and Cenotaph plaques as well as on the Methodist Church Honor Roll and St. Peter’s Anglican Chancel Screen.

Arthur Henry Robinson - Lest We Forget

Arthur Henry Robinson was born May 5, 1898 at Revelstoke. He was the son of John Robinson, born July 1, 1866 in Ontario and Alice Thomas Robinson, born June 30, 1871 in Nova Scotia. Alice Robinson died in 1902 and John Robinson married Alice Hendricks Jackson in 1904. John Robinson was the brother of Dan and Fred Robinson, owners of Revelstoke’s first saw mills, and John joined his brothers here to work with them in their mills. Arthur had two sisters: Ada, born in 1892 and Myrtle, born in 1896, and two brothers: Walter born in 1893 and Victor, born in 1895. All the Robinson children were born in Revelstoke.

Arthur Henry Robinson signed his enlistment papers June 1, 1916 at Kamloops.  He was 18 years old, single, 5’ 7” tall with brown hair and grey-brown eyes. He worked as a printer. His religious affiliation was Methodist. Arthur had been serving with the 102nd RMR prior to enlisting.

Arthur Henry Robinson died August 11, 1918 perhaps during the start of Canada’s One Hundred days of fighting at the end of the war. He was 20 years old. At the time of his death he was a Private serving with the 47th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (British Columbia) Regiment. His body was never found or identified and his name is memorialized on the Vimy Memorial.

Arthur Robinson was the brother of Walter Robinson who perished in April of 1915. Walter was the first volunteer from Revelstoke to perish in the war on active service overseas. Arthur died near the very end of the war. Walter’s body was also never located or identified and his name is memorialized on the Menin Gate (Ypres). The Robinson brothers are the only two members from the same Revelstoke family to die in the Great War. Their other brother Victor also served in the war and survived. They also had at least two cousins who served overseas, Beverley and Fred, both sons of Dan Robinson.

The name of Arthur Robinson is inscribed on the Courthouse and Cenotaph plaques as well as the Methodist Church Honor Roll and the YMCA Honor Roll.

Descendants of the Robinson family still reside in Revelstoke.

Thomas Harold Reade - Lest We Forget

Thomas Harold Reade was born July 25, 1889 at Niagara Falls, Ontario. He was the son of Thomas W. Reade, M.D. and Alice M. Reade of Niagara Falls. He attended Upper Canada College and then entered the service in the Imperial Bank in Toronto. By 1914 he was working as a bank accountant for the Imperial Bank of Canada in Revelstoke. He had also been very interested in the military life having served three years with the Queen’s Own Rifles at Toronto, six months with the 102nd RMR, and three months with the 89th Regiment, Calgary.

Thomas Harold Reade married Frances Lawson in Revelstoke on August 24, 1916 at St. Peter’s Anglican Church. Frances Lawson was from a prominent Revelstoke family and was a very talented musician, organizing concerts and dramas, and conducting music lessons. She taught the joy of music and culture to many children during the war years. They had a son, Thomas Harold Jr., born July 31, 1917 at the Queen Victoria Hospital in Revelstoke.

Thomas Reade signed his overseas enlistment papers on December 2, 1916 at Calgary as a lieutenant. He was 27 years old and married. He was 5’8” tall, and had brown eyes and dark hair.

Because of the prominence of Frances Lawson in the community there are numerous notices of her visits to her husband prior to his shipping out to France.  She was also very involved in the patriotic appeals during the war and held many concerts to raise money for the war effort.

Thomas Harold Reade died April 5, 1918, perhaps during the last German offensive of the war. He was 29 years old. At the time of his death he was a Lieutenant with the 29th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (British Columbia) Regiment. He is buried in the Bac-Du-Sud British Cemetery, France.

Thomas Reade’s wife and child were living in Revelstoke during the war but after the death of Thomas Reade they moved east to Toronto.

The name of Thomas Harold Reade is inscribed on the Courthouse and Cenotaph plaques. He is also remembered on a memorial tablet at Upper Canada College in Toronto, and on a panel in St. Thomas Anglican Church, Toronto. 

 

Edward Quinton - Lest We Forget

Edward Quinton was born November 1, 1885 at Needham Market, Suffolk, England. His father Jesse Quinton was living in England in 1914. Edward Quinton was working as a locomotive fireman for the Canadian Pacific Railroad in Revelstoke when war broke out. He was one of 69 men who immediately volunteered to serve.

Edward Quinton signed his enlistment papers on September 23, 1914 at Valcartier, Quebec. His regimental number was 17048. He had enlisted with the First Contingent of Canadian Volunteers to serve in France. He was almost 29 years old, single, 5’ 8” tall with brown hair and greenish grey eyes. His religious affiliation was Methodist.

Edward Quinton was a survivor of the Canadian Army’s baptism of fire at the Second Battle of Ypres. A letter he sent back to Revelstoke describing his experiences was printed in the local paper May 26, 1915:

“I feel I have lived a long time since I wrote you last. The big battle was one long nightmare. The enemy simply rained shells over us, and came on us in droves; but still we held them back, men dropping on both sides like nine-pins. It is marvelous how cool a man feels when comrades are falling all around. He is facing death every minute. All our boys seemed quite calm, smoking cigarettes, and passing them along to one another; but after the reinforcements came the reaction set in and men shook hands with comrades whom they thought dead. What a pitiful few they were.”

Edward Quinton was a Private serving with the 7th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (British Columbia) Regiment and was temporarily transferred to the Canadian Military Police. He married Florence May Ree in Eastbourne, Sussex, England early in 1918. At the end of the war, he returned to Vancouver and was admitted to Shaughnessy Hospital where he died of pneumonia on February 28, 1919. He was 33 years old. He is buried at the Mountain View Cemetery, Vancouver, British Columbia. His wife moved to Savannah, Georgia, where she remarried and was known as Florence Elderson.

Edward Quinton’s name is inscribed as Quinten on the Courthouse and Cenotaph plaques as well as the YMCA Honor Roll.

 

David Pyper - Lest We Forget

David Pyper was born March 27, 1878 at Forfordshire, Scotland.  His father Robert Pyper lived in Arbroath, Scotland.  In 1914 David Pyper was working as a carpenter in the Revelstoke area and was a member of the 102nd Rocky Mountain Rangers, the local militia regiment for this area.

David Pyper signed his enlistment papers March 3, 1915 at Victoria. He was part of the Third Contingent of volunteers from Canada to go overseas. His regimental number was 430187. He was 37 years old, 5’ 11” tall with black hair and grey eyes. His religious affiliation was Presbyterian. Although he was listed as single on his attestation papers, after his death, there was mention of a widow, Mary Pyper, of Lena, Manitoba. The 1906 Manitoba census lists them as living at Souris, Manitoba in that year. It is possible that they were separated at the time that David Pyper enlisted.

David Pyper died November 17, 1915 of drowning. He had suffered severe wounds to his left hand, and was one of 390 injured soldiers travelling from Calais to Dover on the Hospital Ship Anglia. The ship hit a mine laid by a German U-boat, and 134 of the people onboard died, including David Pyper.  At the time of his death he was a Private with the 31st Battalion, Canadian Infantry (Alberta) Regiment. He is buried at Hollybrook Memorial, Hampshire, England.

The name of David Pyper is inscribed on the Courthouse and Cenotaph plaques.

Earl Pettipiece - Lest We Forget

Earl Pettipiece was born May 15, 1889 at Essex, Ontario. He was the son of Matthew Pettipiece, born April 24, 1849 in Ontario of German ancestry and of Barbara Pettipiece, born March 20, 1852, Ontario, of Irish ancestry. By 1897, the family was living in Revelstoke. The 1901 census of Revelstoke showed that he had two sisters, Edith and Lillian and brothers John, Willie, Murray, Leslie and George. An older brother, Richard Parmeter Pettipiece, was already married and living in Revelstoke where he was publisher of the Revelstoke Herald newspaper. Earl was one of the first students to attend the Revelstoke High School when it opened in 1904. He did not graduate, but left school and began working for the CPR. Earl married Emma Gladys McMullen at Collingwood, B.C. on November 14, 1912 and was working as a brakeman for the CPR.

Earl Pettipiece signed his enlistment papers May 30, 1915 at Vernon. His regimental number was 42240. He was one of around 100 men from Revelstoke who joined the 54th Battalion in the spring and summer of 1915. He was 26 years old, married, 5’ 11” tall with black hair and grey eyes. His religious affiliation was Wesleyan (Methodist). A child was born to Earl and Gladys Pettipiece shortly after Earl departed for the front. Brother George joined up with the Railway troops in 1917 and went overseas but was later declared unfit for more duty because of a short leg. Earl’s nephew Clarke Wallace Pettipiece also served with the motorcycle section of the Western University corps.

Earl Pettipiece died on June 3, 1916, one of six Revelstoke men to die on that day during the battle for Mount Sorrel. He was killed by the same shell that killed Judd Eaton, another Revelstoke volunteer. Pettipiece was 27 years old. At the time of his death he was a Private with the 7th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (British Columbia) Regiment. His body was never recovered or identified and his name is memorialized on the Menin Gate (Ypres) Memorial, Belgium. After the war his wife Gladys and their child were living in Vancouver.

A week before the death of Earl Pettipiece, his nephew Firby, son of R.P. and Nellie Pettipiece, died in an accident at Rogers Pass during the construction of the Connaught Tunnel. Firby’s uncle George Pettipiece was operating a steam shovel when it overturned and killed 18 year old Firby. At the time, Firby’s father was living in Vancouver where he published The Federationist, a Socialist newspaper. 

The name of Earl Pettipiece is inscribed on the Courthouse and Cenotaph plaques and on the Methodist Church Honor Roll and the YMCA Honor Roll. Earl Pettipiece's mother and at least two brothers are buried in the Mountain View Cemetery at Revelstoke. 

 YMCA Senior Basketball Champions, 1908 to 1909. Earl Pettipiece seated, right

YMCA Senior Basketball Champions, 1908 to 1909. Earl Pettipiece seated, right

Gordon Thomas Patrick - Lest We Forget

 

Gordon Thomas Patrick was born June 14, 1889 at South Durham, Quebec, the son of John and Annie Patrick. After the war John and Annie were living in Ottawa. The 1889 year of birth is what Gordon claimed on his attestation papers. According to the 1911 Census, Gordon Patrict was living on Fourth Street at the home of his sister, Mrs. Nancy Hooley, her husband Francis, and their three young boys. In 1911, the oldest son, Victor was 7 years old, Gordon was 5 years old and Delbert was 4 years old.

Gordon Patrick signed his enlistment papers November 16, 1917 at Lethbridge, Alberta. His regimental number was 3205734. He was 28 years old. In 1917 he was working as a fireman for the CPR, was single, 5’ 10” tall with dark brown hair and blue-green eyes. He sailed for England on the HMS Metagama, arriving at Liverpool on April 19, 1918.

Gordon Patrick died on October 12, 1918, one month short of the end of the war, during the campaign called Canada’s One Hundred Days, a Canadian offensive that contributed greatly to the ending of the war. He was 29 years old and was a Private with the 10th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (Alberta) Regiment. He is buried at the Dury Crucifix Cemetery, France.

The Revelstoke Review of November 7, 1918 had this notice:

“Mrs. F. D. Hooley has just received the news of the death of her brother, Private Gordon Patrick, who was killed on October 12. Private Patrick was a Revelstoke boy and enlisted in Calgary.”

The name of Gordon Patrick is not inscribed on the Courthouse plaque, but is on the Cenotaph plaque.

Relatives of Gordon Patrick are still living in Revelstoke.