Earl Pettipiece - Lest We Forget

Earl Pettipiece was born May 15, 1889 at Essex, Ontario. He was the son of Matthew Pettipiece, born April 24, 1849 in Ontario of German ancestry and of Barbara Pettipiece, born March 20, 1852, Ontario, of Irish ancestry. By 1897, the family was living in Revelstoke. The 1901 census of Revelstoke showed that he had two sisters, Edith and Lillian and brothers John, Willie, Murray, Leslie and George. An older brother, Richard Parmeter Pettipiece, was already married and living in Revelstoke where he was publisher of the Revelstoke Herald newspaper. Earl was one of the first students to attend the Revelstoke High School when it opened in 1904. He did not graduate, but left school and began working for the CPR. Earl married Emma Gladys McMullen at Collingwood, B.C. on November 14, 1912 and was working as a brakeman for the CPR.

Earl Pettipiece signed his enlistment papers May 30, 1915 at Vernon. His regimental number was 42240. He was one of around 100 men from Revelstoke who joined the 54th Battalion in the spring and summer of 1915. He was 26 years old, married, 5’ 11” tall with black hair and grey eyes. His religious affiliation was Wesleyan (Methodist). A child was born to Earl and Gladys Pettipiece shortly after Earl departed for the front. Brother George joined up with the Railway troops in 1917 and went overseas but was later declared unfit for more duty because of a short leg. Earl’s nephew Clarke Wallace Pettipiece also served with the motorcycle section of the Western University corps.

Earl Pettipiece died on June 3, 1916, one of six Revelstoke men to die on that day during the battle for Mount Sorrel. He was killed by the same shell that killed Judd Eaton, another Revelstoke volunteer. Pettipiece was 27 years old. At the time of his death he was a Private with the 7th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (British Columbia) Regiment. His body was never recovered or identified and his name is memorialized on the Menin Gate (Ypres) Memorial, Belgium. After the war his wife Gladys and their child were living in Vancouver.

A week before the death of Earl Pettipiece, his nephew Firby, son of R.P. and Nellie Pettipiece, died in an accident at Rogers Pass during the construction of the Connaught Tunnel. Firby’s uncle George Pettipiece was operating a steam shovel when it overturned and killed 18 year old Firby. At the time, Firby’s father was living in Vancouver where he published The Federationist, a Socialist newspaper. 

The name of Earl Pettipiece is inscribed on the Courthouse and Cenotaph plaques and on the Methodist Church Honor Roll and the YMCA Honor Roll. Earl Pettipiece's mother and at least two brothers are buried in the Mountain View Cemetery at Revelstoke. 

 YMCA Senior Basketball Champions, 1908 to 1909. Earl Pettipiece seated, right

YMCA Senior Basketball Champions, 1908 to 1909. Earl Pettipiece seated, right

Gordon Thomas Patrick - Lest We Forget

 

Gordon Thomas Patrick was born June 14, 1889 at South Durham, Quebec, the son of John and Annie Patrick. After the war John and Annie were living in Ottawa. The 1889 year of birth is what Gordon claimed on his attestation papers. According to the 1911 Census, Gordon Patrict was living on Fourth Street at the home of his sister, Mrs. Nancy Hooley, her husband Francis, and their three young boys. In 1911, the oldest son, Victor was 7 years old, Gordon was 5 years old and Delbert was 4 years old.

Gordon Patrick signed his enlistment papers November 16, 1917 at Lethbridge, Alberta. His regimental number was 3205734. He was 28 years old. In 1917 he was working as a fireman for the CPR, was single, 5’ 10” tall with dark brown hair and blue-green eyes. He sailed for England on the HMS Metagama, arriving at Liverpool on April 19, 1918.

Gordon Patrick died on October 12, 1918, one month short of the end of the war, during the campaign called Canada’s One Hundred Days, a Canadian offensive that contributed greatly to the ending of the war. He was 29 years old and was a Private with the 10th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (Alberta) Regiment. He is buried at the Dury Crucifix Cemetery, France.

The Revelstoke Review of November 7, 1918 had this notice:

“Mrs. F. D. Hooley has just received the news of the death of her brother, Private Gordon Patrick, who was killed on October 12. Private Patrick was a Revelstoke boy and enlisted in Calgary.”

The name of Gordon Patrick is not inscribed on the Courthouse plaque, but is on the Cenotaph plaque.

Relatives of Gordon Patrick are still living in Revelstoke.

Victor Offord - Lest We Forget

Victor Offord was born April 5, 1891 at Hartlepool, England. He came to Canada in 1910. He was the son of Alfred Offord, born June 1845, England, and Louisa Douse Offord born March 1850. They came to Canada in 1911. Alfred died in Revelstoke on December 12, 1927 at the age of 82 and Louisa Ellen Offord, died in Revelstoke on April 26, 1933 at the age of 83. Victor had two brothers, Frederick born June 1881 and William born October 1885 and a sister, May Elizabeth born August 1882. May married William Belcher in Revelstoke in 1913.

Victor Offord signed his enlistment papers on May 8, 1916 at Revelstoke. His regimental number was 490646. He was 25 years old, single, 5’ 5 ½” tall with light brown hair and blue eyes. He was working as a blacksmith. His religious affiliation was Anglican. He was medically examined by a local doctor, W.H. Sutherland.

Victor Offord died July 25, 1917. He was 26 years old. At the time of his death he was a Private with the 124th Canadian Pioneer Battalion, Canadian Pioneers.  He is buried at the Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery, France.

A letter from Victor’s commanding officer to his mother was printed in the August 23, 1917 edition of the Revelstoke Review and said, in part:

“…Your son had endeared himself to our ranks by his cheerful disposition, and had made a name for himself as a thoroughly reliable soldier by his unswerving devotion to duty, under any circumstances, and in the face of any danger. He was instantly killed by shell fire on the night of July 25th, when on his way with a working party to carry out a certain piece of work.”

Victor's brothers Fred and William also served in the war. Fred was almost 41 and a widower when he enlisted April 20, 1917 at Revelstoke. William Offord was wounded around the same time as Victor’s death. After the war William and Fred farmed in the Mount MacPherson area.  Fred Offord died in Revelstoke in 1953 at the age of 75 and William Offord died in Revelstoke in 1980 at the age of 95.

The name of Victor Offord is inscribed on the Courthouse and Cenotaph plaques.

 

Frank Murphy - Lest We Forget

Frank Murphy was born September 22, 1881 at Whitby, Ontario. He was working as a rancher in the Arrowhead area when war was declared in August 1914. He listed his brother Dennis Murphy, of Toronto, Ontario as his next of kin.

Frank Murphy signed his enlistment papers September 28, 1915 at Vernon. His regimental number was 464412. He was 34 years old, single, 5’ 9” tall with black hair and brown eyes. His religious affiliation was Presbyterian. Just prior to his departure for the Vernon camp he was one of the guests at a party in Arrowhead at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Johnston, 24 Mile Board to host the local men who had signed up. He was taken out on a moonlight excursion on the Arrow Lake that evening. He sailed with his unit on the SS Baltic on April 1, 1916, arriving in England on April 10.

Frank Murphy died September 27, 1916 of wounds received during the battle of the Somme. He was 35 years old. At the time of his death he was a Private serving with the 14th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (Quebec) Regiment. He is buried at the Contay British Cemetery, France.

The name of Frank Murphy is inscribed on the Courthouse and Cenotaph plaques under the Arrowhead listing.

 

Daniel Montgomery - Lest We Forget

Daniel Montgomery was born February 4, 1888 at Parry Sound, Ontario. He was the son of Son of James A. Montgomery and Annie McNeil Montgomery, who lived in Morse, Saskatchewan at the beginning of the war, and later moved to Revelstoke. Daniel Montgomery had a brother, John Alexander, born September 26, 1893, who enlisted in December of 1915, and a sister, Alice Irene, born circa 1897. Alice married John Alexander Davidson in Revelstoke in 1922.

Daniel Montgomery was living in Revelstoke and working as a labourer in the Arrowhead area when war broke out in August of 1914. He signed his enlistment papers December 8, 1914 at Victoria. His regimental number was 107432. He was 26 years old, single, 6’ 2” tall with dark brown hair and brown eyes. His height would have made him stand out among all the other recruits. His religious affiliation was Presbyterian.

Daniel Montgomery died September 28, 1916 during the battle of the Somme.  He was 28 years old. At the time of his death he was a Sergeant serving with the 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles, Canadian Infantry (British Columbia) Regiment.  He is buried at Courcelette British Cemetery, Somme, France.

The name of Daniel Montgomery is inscribed on the Courthouse and Cenotaph plaques under the Arrowhead listing.

 

 

 

Charles Robert McRae - Lest We Forget

Charles McRae was born July 13, 1894 at Illecillewaet, B.C. He was the son of Alex McRae born Feb 7, 1863 in Ontario, of Scotch descent and Annie McRae, born March 18, 1871 in England. Two of his brothers were born at Illecillewaet: Alexander on Feb. 26 1892 and Walter on Oct. 10 1896.  He had four other brothers, all born in Revelstoke: Thomas born Oct. 26 1898, William John born April 17, 1901, James born Oct. 19, 1903 and Mundy born March 1907.  

Alex McRae was a prominent merchant and mining and lumber speculator in the early history of Revelstoke. Charles was employed as a newspaper reporter for the Revelstoke Review at the time he signed up. He is recorded as attending the Revelstoke High School in 1907.

Charles McRae signed his enlistment papers June 4, 1915 at Vernon, one of about 100 men from Revelstoke to join the 54th Battalion in the spring and summer of 1915. His regimental number was 442161. He was 21 years old, single, 5’ 8” tall with black hair and hazel eyes. His religious affiliation was Presbyterian. Charles’ older brother, Alexander, also joined up.

Charles McRae died June 14, 1916 during the battle for Mount Sorrel. He was 22 years old.  At the time of his death he was a Private with the 7th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (British Columbia) Regiment. He is buried at the Railway Dugouts Burial Ground, Belgium.

The Review of July 6, 1916 carried this article on the death of Charlie McRae:

            “Mr. and Mrs. A. McRae, on Tuesday evening received letters from E.S. Kidner, officer commanding the 7th battalion, and from Freddie McMahon, announcing the sad news of the death of their son “Charlie,” who was killed in France on June 15th.  “Charlie,” who joined with the second expeditionary force, and left for the front about a year ago, had been on active service in the trenches in France for seven months and five days. He was in the great battle of St. Eloi on June 3rd and 4th and was in the trenches at the time of the death of Judd Eaton and Earl Pettipiece, and with Fred McMahon he came through that famous battle without an injury, and was enjoying a well earned rest in billets five miles behind the lines when a shell exploded over the tent in which he was resting, killing him instantly.

            The news of “Charlie’s” death caused wide spread sorrow in the city, where he was so well and favourably known, being one of the most popular young men in the city, with hosts of personal friends.”

The name of Charles McRae is inscribed on the courthouse and Cenotaph plaques.

 McRae family home on Third Street West, circa 1903. P196

McRae family home on Third Street West, circa 1903. P196

Angus McLeod - Lest We Forget

Angus McLeod was born January 4, 1886 at Lochinver, Scotland. He was the son of Norman and N. MacLeod of Inverkirkaig, Sutherlandshire, Scotland.  Angus was a carpenter and was living in Arrowhead.

Angus McLeod signed his enlistment papers May 23, 1915 at Vernon. He was 29 years old, single, 5’ 10” tall with dark brown hair and grey eyes. His religious affiliation was Presbyterian. His regimental number was 442160. He was one of about 100 men from the Revelstoke and Arrowhead area to enlist with the 54th Battalion in the spring and summer of 1915. The local newspaper reported that there was only one unmarried male of military age living in Arrowhead that summer. All the rest had joined up.

Angus McLeod died June 5, 1916 during the battle for Mount Sorrel. He was 30 years old. At the time of his death he was a Private serving with the 16th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (Manitoba) Regiment. He is buried at the Railway Dugouts Burial Ground, Belgium.

The name of Angus McLeod is inscribed on the Courthouse and Cenotaph plaques under the Arrowhead listing.

 

John Donald (Rory) McLennan - Lest We Forget

John Donald (Rory) McLennan was born January 6, 1880 at River Denys Nova Scotia. He was the son of Allan and Margaret McLennan and the husband of Georgina G. McLennan. In 1916 he was working as a railway conductor at Field.

John Donald McLennan signed his enlistment papers on May 30, 1916 at Kamloops, B.C. He was 36 years old, married, with some military experience with the 102nd RMR. He was 6 feet tall, an uncommon height at that time. He enlisted as a Lieutenant. He sailed for England on the SS Maurentania on October 25, 2016, arriving there on October 31.

John Donald (Rory) McLennan died on April 9, 1917 at Vimy Ridge. He was 37 years old. At the time of his death he was a Lieutenant with the 72nd Battalion, Canadian Infantry (British Columbia) Regiment. He is buried at the Givenchy–En–Gohelle Canadian Cemetery.

The Review of June 7, 1917 carried this item on the death of Rory McLennan.

            “Rory McLennan Killed in Action:  Hundreds of friends throughout B.C. will learn with the deepest regret of the death of Lieutenant John Donald (Rory) McLennan, who left Vernon in October of last year and who was mortally wounded at Vimy Ridge on April 9, dying before the stretcher bearers reached the dressing station. The late Lieut. McLennan was born at River Denys, N.S. At the age of 17 he left his home for the Pacific coast, and has almost ever since been with the C.P.R., holding several responsible positions with that company.

            "The late Lieut. McLennan was sent as a representative from the city of Revelstoke to the coronation of King Edward VII, an honor which he modestly accepted and creditably filled, being one of the winners of the international tug-of-war team when the Canadians won the world's championship. Since going to France he was the captain of a winning team on two occasions. An athlete of outstanding ability, Lieut. McLennan, or as he was more familiarly known, "Rory", was always a leading spirit in the organization of field sports. In 1903 he carried off the Maxwell gold medal as champion wrestler of the coast, besides holding the title for the maritime provinces. 

           "In November 1908, he married Miss Georgina Urquhart of Courtenay, Vancouver Island, who with four children, survive him. His death cast hundreds of friends and relatives under the shadow of a great loss. A devoted husband and father, a true, noble son and brother, an esteemed friend and a loyal soldier, with a heart as big as his great manly body, Lieutenant McLennan was universally loved and few will be more missed by his friends.”

The name of Rory McLennan is not listed on either the Courthouse or Cenotaph plaques in Revelstoke. He is included in this memorial because he worked out of Revelstoke for several years.

 CPR Champion Tug-of-war team, 1906. John Donald (Rory) McLennan is on the right in the front row. RMA-P63

CPR Champion Tug-of-war team, 1906. John Donald (Rory) McLennan is on the right in the front row. RMA-P63

Clifford Jack McLennan - Lest We Forget

Clifford Jack McLennan was born July 25, 1897 at New Westminster, B.C, although the 1911 census claims he was born in 1900. His father was Jack McLennan who in 1916 was living at Fraser Mills, B.C. The 1911 census shows the rest of the family living in Revelstoke on Third Street. There was mother Bella McLennan who was born April 1872 in Ontario, sister Mabel born 1894 in B.C. and brother Harold born March 1896 in B.C. Harold worked as a CPR machinist.  Although the children were all claimed to be born in B.C. on the 1911 census, the B.C. Archives record of births does not register any of them as being born in B.C.  The B.C. Archives does note that Mabel Mary J. McLennan married David Orr at Revelstoke on December 25, 1912.  It also notes that Harold McLennan married Norah Marrs at Revelstoke on September 24, 1927. The B.C. Archives record of deaths notes that Mabel Mary Jesse Orr died in Victoria on January 6, 1957 at the age of 62.

Clifford Jack McLennan signed his enlistment papers March 13, 1916 at Vancouver. He was either 15 or 18 years old, single, 5’ 8” tall with brown hair and brown eyes. He gave his occupation as teamster. His religious affiliation was Anglican. At the time of his enlistment he was living on 61st Avenue, South Vancouver. He sailed from Halifax on the SS Olympic on November 14, 1916.

Clifford Jack McLennan died August 28, 1917, perhaps during the battle for Hill 70. He was either 17 or 20 years old. At the time of his death he was a Private with the 29th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (British Columbia) Regiment. He was presumed to have died while a prisoner of war at Feldlazarett Leforest. He is buried at the Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery, France.

The name of Clifford McLennan is inscribed on the Courthouse and Cenotaph plaques.

Posted on September 22, 2017 .

Leo McKinnon - Lest We Forget

Leo McKinnon was born March 2, 1887 at Sydney Mines, Nova Scotia. His brother, Hector McKinnon, was Revelstoke’s mayor for most of the war years.  Another brother, Joe, also lived here for many years, and with Hector, ran McKinnon’s Pool Hall on First Street. Leo gave his occupation as merchant on his attestation paper. He joined up with the Second Contingent of Canadian Volunteers to go overseas. He also had three sisters, who at the time of his death were living on the west coast.

Leo McKinnon signed his enlistment papers November 7, 1914 at Victoria. He was 27 years old, single, 5’ 3” tall with dark hair and dark eyes. His religious affiliation was Roman Catholic. After he reached the front in May of 1915 he sent home many letters which were printed in the local newspaper. He noted the names of the Revelstoke casualties, his experiences as a stretcher-bearer and the dangers of snipers and shelling. On one occasion shells burst around a party, of which he was one, while engaged in preparing tea. The tea was ruined, but all the party escaped. On another occasion a bullet ripped a sandbag he was carrying but he escaped injury. He said that he was trying to send off his diary if the officers would pass it. He also had some nerve-wracking experiences in no man’s land. He was eventually wounded at the battle of the Somme and spent some time in hospital in England. In January of 1917 he returned to action promoted from Sergeant to Lieutenant.

Leo McKinnon died on April 9, 1917 at Vimy Ridge, one of 12 Revelstoke soldiers who died in that battle. He was 30 years old. At the time of his death he was a Lieutenant with the 7th Battalion, Canadian Infantry (British Columbia) Regiment. He is buried at the Nine Elms Military Cemetery, France.

In May of 1917 Maple trees were planted around the courthouse in memory of all the Revelstoke men who had perished in the war. It was the sad duty of Leo’s brother, Mayor Hector McKinnon to officiate at this ceremony. He said these words: “It is but a small thing to plant some trees in honour of our boys, but it will show they are not forgotten and will in years to come serve to remind these children assembled here today what they owe to the brave lads who gave up splendid positions and loved ones and adopted the Maple Leaf as their badge, many of them to go down to their death, that we might live in safety. Let us not forget them but prepare in a substantial way to receive with open arms those who may be spared to return.”

The name of Leo McKinnon is inscribed on the Courthouse and Cenotaph plaques.

Many family members still reside in Revelstoke.

 Leo McKinnon on active service overseas during World War I

Leo McKinnon on active service overseas during World War I